News Roundup: Great Tutorial Resources, Akshell, and Web Audio Manipulation

New Tutorials

There have been several handy tutorials released lately, and I thought it might be useful to collect a few of them here.

  • Ben Lister’s blog post, Getting Started with HTML5 Local Databases, is a clear, thorough introduction to client-side SQLite databases. The definitive resource is still Apple’s client-side storage reference, but Lister’s article is probably an easier place to start, if you’re completely new to client-side databases.
  • Using CSS3 Transitions, Transforms and Animation is a truly fantastic roundup of all of the various animation and transformation properties and functions that are available in CSS3. The site features tons of examples that should be a tremendous help while you sort out the reasonably complicated syntax of some of these properties. This one is definitely worth a bookmark.
  • HOWTO: Unobtrusive JavaScript with Rails 3 is a great article on the Rails Inside blog on how to swap out the Prototype-based unobtrusive Javascript helpers for the official jQuery version managed by the Rails team.
  • It was just a couple of weeks ago that we last checked in on DailyJS’s “Let’s Make a Framework” series. This week, they’ve got another handy post on how to handle cross-domain Ajax requests with JSON-P. JSON-P is technique that’s usually used for consuming JSON data from APIs on a different domain from the one issuing the request. If this tool isn’t in your utility belt, definitely check out this article.
  • Speaking of cross-domain Ajax, the intrepid Nicholas Zakas has a super-handy introduction to browser-native cross-domain Ajax via Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS). CORS is actually pretty well supported among modern browsers, but for whatever reason, it hasn’t seen a lot of discussion or use by the web development community. Here’s hoping Zakas’s introduction can go towards changing that.

Akshell

Akshell is a nifty new tool for creating and hosting Javascript applications. It’s a lot like Heroku’s recently announced support for Node.js, although instead of Node, you build apps in a scratch-built Javascript MVC framework.

Akshell provides a number of useful resources for building web apps. It includes its own template library, and even offers database support. Further, it uses CommonJS-like modules for organizing code (the Akshell core engine is such a module).

Honestly, there might not be a ton of practical uses for a site like Akshell, where you have to learn yet another server-side Javascript framework (and one that’s only usable on the Akshell site). However, a lot of really solid work went into building this impressive tool, and it’s totally worth taking a minute to poke around the admin interface and read through the documentation.

Experiments with Audio

Experiments with Audio is a series of articles on the Bread and Circuits blog that covers innovations in web audio. The most recent post in the series covers some truly amazing work being done in processing audio in the browser. There are tons of mind-blowingly cool examples, but the thing that really floored me was the Javascript text-to-speech implementation. Imagine if sites were able to offer full, custom text-to-speech rendering of their content to any user-agent without needing a screen reader. Just great stuff.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • description
  • Reddit
  • TwitThis
  • Simpy
  • StumbleUpon

Leave a Reply




© webdevpublishing 2011